• Hannah Telluselle

Building a green economy

I used to separate issues of immigration and living eco-friendly, but after being removed from the United States in 2012, I started to look into and learn more about migration overall. Why do people flee, besides from war, and how can this impact the environment?

First, one thinks of the distribution of goods with heavy transportation across the globe, as well as our own flying. This it seems, have grown in awareness of most people, so hopefully we can now move towards a more sustainable society.


Second, some people do flee natural disasters, whether flooding, tsunamis or earthquakes, or due to the more slow but steady changes due to climate change, such as unclean water, droughts and rising ocean levels.


But we also have a third problem that needs to have a global solution, I was made aware of today. I've been wondering about why so many people have gone to the United States from Venezuela lately. What prompted President Trump to want to build a wall and why does President Biden want to transport people in secret overnight to various places, that seldom deport any, so called sanctuary cities and states? According to my Bolivian acquaintance, there used to be a very left-wing radical leader in Venezuela, who didn't re-invest the profits made by selling oil. Now the oil prices have dropped substantially with no other big export in its place, creating a growing poverty. Alas, the strive towards building a green economy using less oil, at the same time produces a greater need for a substitute not only for fossil free fuel but also as a source of income.

What is then the solution? What can Venezuela do to get their own economy back on its feet with something new and green, while also ensuring a fair distribution of its resources? This should be the main focus for solving the immigration crisis and why the work of UN is so important, I think. Coming to a global consensus is a must, while remaining flexible by the border.

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